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❝FROM THE MISSOURI RIVER TO THE SEA, ALL OPPRESSED PEOPLES WILL BE FREE❞

eesabella / new york city @imjnyc

a todas las mujeres que silenciosamente han construdo la historia~

this is my personal blog, also i am a minor, do not send me unsolicited sexual messages whatsoever.

triphopfightsback:

Jimmy || M.I.A.

howtobeafuckinglady:

Halloween concepts 

howtobeafuckinglady:

Halloween concepts 

thedoppelganger:

The Color of Pomegranates, Sergéi Paradzhánov, 1968

accradotalt:

THE MANY FACES OF BRIANNA: MASKING AND FABRIC COLLAGE

Brianna McCarthy is a mixed media visual communicator working and living in Trinidad + Tobago. She is a self-taught artist and aims to create a new discourse examining issues of beauty, stereotypes, representation as well as the documenting the process – particularly poignant in an ever smaller digitally connected world.
Her form takes shape through masking and performance art, fabric collage, traditional media, and installation pieces.

Via africandigitalart.com

thepalestineyoudontknow:

From the funeral of 13 years old, Baha’ bader from Biet Leqia village near Ramallah Today, Baha was shot in the heart by Israeli army soldiers who were raiding his village  \ by  Fadi AlArori


Israeli forces shoot, kill 13-year-old Palestinian near Ramallah

The death of Bahaa brings the total number of Palestinians killed by Israeli forces in the occupied West Bank so far this year to 42, in addition to the nearly 2,200 Palestinians slain during Israel’s summer offensive across Gaza.More than 4,300 Palestinians have also been injured by Israeli soldiers in the West Bank since the beginning of 2014, as well as more than 11,000 during the nearly two-month assault on Gaza.

thepalestineyoudontknow:

From the funeral of 13 years old, Baha’ bader from Biet Leqia village near Ramallah Today, Baha was shot in the heart by Israeli army soldiers who were raiding his village  \ by  Fadi AlArori
The death of Bahaa brings the total number of Palestinians killed by Israeli forces in the occupied West Bank so far this year to 42, in addition to the nearly 2,200 Palestinians slain during Israel’s summer offensive across Gaza.

More than 4,300 Palestinians have also been injured by Israeli soldiers in the West Bank since the beginning of 2014, as well as more than 11,000 during the nearly two-month assault on Gaza.
oupacademic:

Valentina Baú argues that when people participate in the production of a media story, it allows them to both reflect upon and become aware of their situation, as well as to share their experience and create an understanding among groups. (via Transforming conflict into peace | OUPblog)

oupacademic:

Valentina Baú argues that when people participate in the production of a media story, it allows them to both reflect upon and become aware of their situation, as well as to share their experience and create an understanding among groups. (via Transforming conflict into peace | OUPblog)

"There are political, educational, scientific, and cultural reasons to support endangered languages and the communities who speak them. There is the straightforward question of justice and minority rights, since it is always the powerful who impose their languages on the powerless. There are the vast reserves of history, literature, knowledge, and wisdom embedded in these languages, the loss of which leaves all of us impoverished. Children learn best when educated in their mother tongue, but, too obsessed with the imperatives of indoctrination and assimilation, few governments ensure this basic human right. Linguistic and cultural continuity holds people together, boosting the resilience of indigenous communities in crisis. Multilingualism is strongly linked to cognitive development, potentially enhancing our capacity for empathy and open-mindedness. Yet far from being a marker of advanced formal education, multilingualism is actually the preserve of the “bottom billion,” who have no choice but to learn their more powerful neighbors’ languages.

Leftists, liberals, and progressives have a bigger stake in the future of language than they know. We hardly realize how deeply embedded capitalist mentalities now are in our very language—the ways we talk about time, space, relationships. Liberals intensely aware of privilege based on gender, race, class, or sexuality seldom consider linguistic privilege—English (or Spanish or Chinese or Hausa) is just the air we breathe. The politics of language, when we practice it at all, has been about framing, about keywords, about sloganeering in the major languages. Meanwhile, the ground is shifting under us. [added emphasis reflects citation in wood s lot]

Cultural destruction is an argument against unrestrained capitalism every bit as powerful as the devastation of the natural environment. Radical thinkers on the left have long recognized that standard languages are a critical element of hegemonic control. Oppressed languages have become major vehicles of dissent—from the role of Yiddish in the early-twentieth-century labor movement to the part played by Quechua and Aymara among the cocalero supporters of Evo Morales. Göran Therborn, writing recently in the New Left Review, rightly identifies “pre-capitalist populations” as one of four main social forces in the world able to mount a convincing critique of twenty-first-century capitalism. “They lack both the numbers and the resources to carry much weight, except locally,” adds Therborn, “but their struggles can be articulated with wider critical movements of resistance.”"

- Ross Perlin, Radical Linguistics in an Age of Extinction | Dissent Magazine 
daughterofzami:

"The Black Panthers have never viewed such paramilitary groups as the Ku Klux Klan or the Minutemen as particularly dangerous. The real danger comes from highly organized Establishment forces -the local police, the National Guard, and the United States military. They were the ones who devastated Watts and killed innocent people. In comparison to them the paramilitary groups are insignificant. In fact, these groups are hardly organized at all. It is the uniformed men who are dangerous and who come into our communities every day to commit violence against us, knowing that the laws will protect them.” - Huey P. Newton, Sacramento and the “Panther Bill”

daughterofzami:

"The Black Panthers have never viewed such paramilitary groups as the Ku Klux Klan or the Minutemen as particularly dangerous. The real danger comes from highly organized Establishment forces -the local police, the National Guard, and the United States military. They were the ones who devastated Watts and killed innocent people. In comparison to them the paramilitary groups are insignificant. In fact, these groups are hardly organized at all. It is the uniformed men who are dangerous and who come into our communities every day to commit violence against us, knowing that the laws will protect them.” 

- Huey P. Newton, Sacramento and the “Panther Bill”

This post for Middle Easterns only. Literally no one else. Not “all ethnicities”. Just Middle Easterns.

cherscrotch:

arabicwithoutborders:

middleeasternsarecool:

We’re awesome and deserve to love our big noses and body hair. Our body hair isnt disgusting. Tummy hair, back hair, arm hair, leg hair, facial hair, all of it. Our noses arent too big. They dont have to be smaller because white people said they have to.

Well, I read it anyway and I’ll just say that at least one white person thinks you’re all awesome the way you are too. Hair, nose, body, skin tone….everything.

Shut up white devil. Stop that white savior shit right away. 

arabicwithoutborders are you illiterate? who asked you

"Under capitalism, if you are not part of the profit machine, if money can’t be made from you, you are not entitled to resources or care and are thrown on the scrap heap. Under capitalism, people with disabilities must fight the system to get basic rights such as food, shelter, housing, community and dignity — so freely given as part of the system in Indigenous cultures."

-

Disability Rights in the Age of Austerity

in critiquing “civilization” and capitalism, this article romanticizes “(pre-1492) Indigenous cultures” and falsely assumes they’re all the same. with that said, some of the general historical points about “disability” being a rather a rather modern stigma, are true and important.